How to calculate the right amount of cashmere yarn for any knitting project – Part III: sweaters

Before reading today’s post, please read this (it’s the introductory part of what I am covering in what follows).
In Part II I gave some indications on how to calculate the amount of cashmere needed to make scarves and shawls.

Today I’ll cover sweaters.

Our starting point (the base to calculate the amount of cashmere) will be a classic design—a basic jumper, knitted in stocking stitch. If you wish to use more intricate stitches, cable, slipped stitche, crossed stitch, etc., please allow for greater quantities of yarn.
As I have mentioned in my previous posts, yarn thickness is actually more important than weight.
If the yarn is fine, it weighs less and yields more; on the contrary, if the yarn is thicker, it will weigh more and yield less. If you know how many meters of cashmere or wool you need to knit a sweater, you’ll be able to establish its weight.

The tables below show approximate number of stitches in a 10 cm stocking stitch sample and the corresponding length in meters of yarn needed to knit a sweater in a given size.
Please remember the figures below are valid on average: tight knitters will need more stitches than loose knitters.

Children : chest measurement (finished sweater)

Approximate number of stitches in a 10 cm stocking stitch sample66 cm (2 yrs)71 cm (4 yrs)76 cm (6 yrs)81,5 cm (8 yrs)86,5 cm (10 yrs)
12297 m369 m442 m505 m580 m
16421 m523 m627 m716 m822 m
20532 m660 m791 m904 m1038 m
24753 m934 m1120 m1279 m1469 m
28829 m1028 m1233 m1408 m1617 m

Adults : chest measurement (finished sweater)

Approximate number of stitches in a 10 cm stocking stitch sample91.5 cm96.5 cm101.5 cm106.5 cm112 cm117 cm122 cm127 cm132 cm
12657 m704 m753 m801 m853 m927 m994 m1049 m1125 m
16931 m998 m1069 m1136 m1210 m1315 m1410 m1488 m1595 m
201175 m1259 m1349 m1434 m1527 m1660 m1780 m1878 m2013 m
241664 m1783 m1909 m2030 m2161 m2350 m2520 m2659 m2850 m
281832 m1962 m2102 m2235 m2380 m2587 m2774 m2927 m3138 m
knitting needle sizeApproximate number of stitches in a 10 cm stocking stitch sample
2.25 – 3.2531 – 26
3.25 – 3.7525 – 28
3.75 – 4.528 – 20
4.5 – 5.520 – 16
5.5 – 815 – 12

here is a practical example:

Step 1: Take one of your favourite sweaters and measure its width (at the chest); let’s say it’s 49 cm. Multiply the number by 2 to obtain the full measurement: 49 cm x 2 = 98 cm. Since the number 98 isn’t shown in the table as the chest measurement, you’ll have to choose between 96.5 e 101.5. I would pick 101,5, as I believe it’s best to have a little more than a little less :-).

Step 2: Choose knitting needles you feel comfortable with that work well with the type of yarn you are interested in. I would look for yarn to work with 4/4,5 needles, my favourites, as the knitting is neither too tight nor too loose.

Step 3: Look for the corresponding metres of yarn you’ll need.

Step 4: Browse through Hircus Filati site and check the Cashmere and selected yarns. For each yarn you’ll find all the relevant information (thickness, needle size, weight and length in metres).

Step 5: Send your order :-).

I hope this post helps you calcutate the cashmere quantity needed to knit a beautiful sweater, even if it’s always an approximation. I suggest you visit Hircus Filati frequently to make sure you don’t miss out on special discounts and sales.

Yarns are not the only items on sale; in fact you can find classic and  elegant clothing garments and accessories in cashmere and exclusive yarns at very special prices.

Enjoy your project … till next time!

Alicja Kwartnik

for Hircus Filati


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Catenella, fettuccia e tubolare

La catenella, la fettuccia e il tubolare sono materiali molto popolari perchè sono estremamente versatili. Sono molto facili e piacevoli da lavorare, inoltre si lavorano molto velocemente, perfetti per i principianti che vogliono osare con progetti grandi, senza dover essere troppo precisi o aspettare troppo tempo per vedere i risultati.

Il filato a catenella ha una lavorazione particolare ed una ottima resa. E’ perfetto per progetti di maglieria e accessori quali sciarpe, scialli, ecc.
Ha un effetto a catena, così il nome catenella; è molto facile da lavorare ed è molto soffice.

La catenella, la fettuccia e il tubolare sono materiali molto popolari perchè sono estremamente versatili. Sono molto facili e piacevoli da lavorare, inoltre si lavorano molto velocemente, perfetti per i principianti che vogliono osare con progetti grandi, senza dover essere troppo precisi o aspettare troppo tempo per vedere i risultati.

Il filato a catenella ha una lavorazione particolare ed una ottima resa. E’ perfetto per progetti di maglieria e accessori quali sciarpe, scialli, ecc.
Ha un effetto a catena, così il nome catenella; è molto facile da lavorare ed è molto soffice.

La fettuccia e il tubolare sono molto versatili, sono perfetti per progetti di decorazione d’interni come coperte, federe, vasi e cestini, ma sono anche ideali per creare deliziose borse. Sono adatti anche per progetti di maglieria e uncinetto, puoi utilizzarli per decorare gli interni di borse, oppure per cover per tablet o computer o smartphone, ecc.. Sono ideali anche per confezionare amigurumi, oppure per realizzare una bella coperta.

Hircus Filati


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How to calculate the right amount of cashmere yarn for any knitting project – Part II: Scarves and Shawls

Before reading today’s post, please read this (It’s the introductory part of what I am covering in what follows).
You’ll probably have already noticed that length is more relevant than the yarn’s weight. When someone asks me “how much wool should I buy for a scarf?”, I don’t know what to answer. It all depends on the type of wool, and even more, on the thickness of the yarn. A 50 gr ball of wool could be as long as 30 and reach up to 300 metres in length. The one 30 mt long will be thicker, the one measuring 300 mt, very fine. Here I would like to help you by simplifying the estimate.

The table below shows the approximate amount of stitches in a 10 cm stocking stitch sample, the corresponding metres of yarn needed to knit a scarf or a shawl.

Please remember these numbers represent an average, so if you have a “tight hand”, you’ll need more stitches, on the contrary, if you have a “loose hand”, you might need less.

Approximate number of stitches in 10 cm (stocking stitch)short scarf 15 x 100 cm (approx)long scarf 25 x 140 cm (approx.)shawl 50 x 280 cm (approx.)
12104 metres243 metres486 metres
16148 metres344 metres688 metres
20186 metres434 metres868 metres
24264 metres614 metres1228 metres
28290 metres676 metres1352 metres
Knitting needle sizeApproximate number of stitches in a 10 cm sample (stocking stitch)
2.25 – 3.2531 – 26
3.25 – 3.7525 – 28
3.75 – 4.528 – 20
4.5 – 5.520 – 16
5.5 – 815 – 12

Obviously, this data may need to be adjusted as it’s based on a sample knitted in stocking stitch. Scarves and shawls, in fact, are generally knitted using more elaborate kinds of stitches which require more yarn.

So if you choose more complex patterns (such as cable or fisherman’s rib stitch), you’ll need to consider an extra 10 – 15% of yarn.

On the Hircus Filati website, you’ll find information on the length of the yarn on sale. Hopefully it will help you make the decision on your purchase.

I can hear the next question in your head: “and what if instead of a scarf, I want to knit a hat, or gloves, or a jumper… how much cashmere would I then need?” You’ll find the answers in the next posts.

In the meantime, back to the scarf. Christmas is approaching and the festive atmosphere reminds us of presents. How many people tell me they don’t know what to give men!!!!! I agree, it’s not as easy as it is for women :-). I suggest a classic: a very precious scarf in cashmere (pure or blend) knitted especially by you. It will surely be highly appreciated!

It isn’t easy to find a pattern for a man’s scarf. Usually you use different types of cable, garter stitch, and sometimes moss stitch. I am suggesting two designs, the first is easier and for beginners, the other, a little more complex. If you wish to add a touch of elegance, make the edges in reverse stocking stitch (see samples below).

Sample 1

is made up of rows of knit garter stitch and rows of purl garter stitch. The number stitches to cast on should be divisible by 20 + 10 (for the last strip) + 6 (for two reverse stocking stitch edges)
1 strip of 10 garter stitches measures about 5 cm (size 4 – 4.5 needles)
First Row: 3 knit, 10 knit, 10 purl, repeat from * to *, 13 knit
Second Row: 3 purl, *10 knit, 10 purl*, repeat from * to *, 10 knit, slip the last 3 stitches to the right needle without knitting, leaving the yarn in front
Third Row: 3 knit, *10 knit, 10 purl*, repeat from * to *, 10 knit, slip the last 3 stitches to the right needle without knitting, leaving the yarn behind
Fourth Row: 3 purl, *10 knit, 10 purl*, repeat from * to *, 10 knit, slip the last 3 stitches to the right needle without knitting, leaving the yarn in front
repeat third and fourth rows.

Sample 2

is made by alternating strips of garter stitch and rib.

Cast on 40 stitches (needle size 4 – 4.5)
First row: 3 knit, * strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), 1 knit, 1 purl, 1 knit, 1 purl, 1 knit, repeat from * to *, strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), 3 knit
Second row: 3 purl, * strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), 1 purl, 1 knit, 1 purl, 1 knit, 1 purl, repeat from * to *, strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), reverse stocking stitch (move the last 3 stitches to the left needle without knitting, leaving the yarn in front)
Third row: edge in reverse stocking stitch (3 knit), * strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), strip of 5 rib (= knit all the knit stitches (3) by entering with your needle into the the knit stitch under the one on the other needle, while the purl stitches will be knitted on the back)*, repeat from * to *, strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), reverse stocking stitch (slip the last 3 stitches to the left needle without knitting, leaving the yarn behind)
Fourth row: edge in reverse stocking stitch (3 knit), * strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), strip of 5 rib (= knit all the knit stitches (2) by entering with your needle into the the knit stitch under the one on the other needle, while the purl stitches will be knitted on the back)*, repeat from * to *, strip of 8 garter stitches (= 8 knit), reverse stocking stitch (slip the last 3 stitches to the left needle without knitting, leaving the yarn in front)

Repeat third and fourth rows up to the desired length.
I hope this post helps you calculate the amount of cashmere needed to make a beautiful scarf.
Have fun knitting! Look out for the next post.

Alicja Kwartnik
for Hircus Filati


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How to calculate the right amount of cashmere yarn for any knitting project – Part I

Let’s suppose you have browsed through Hircus Filati’s website with all its beautiful and precious yarns and that you’ve decided to take on a knitting project to make yourself a Cashmere pullover. You’ve found the yarn you like, the price you’re willing to pay, and you also have a clear idea of the style. You’re about to order, and it occurs to you: how much Cashmere will I need? When buying wool in balls it is quite easy: a lot of manufacturers report the relevant information on the label. They tell you the corresponding length in a single ball (for example 50 gr = 120 m), the knitting needle size you should use, and the number of stitches and rows to use in a 10 cm x 10 cm sample; some even go so far as to tell you the total amount of balls you’ll need for a pullover, depending on the size and the pattern (either long- or short-sleeved).

In general it isn’t as easy to estimate the correct amount of yarn for any particular knitting project, but following you’ll find suggestions and explanations you will surely find very helpful.
Hircus Filati provides its Cashmere and precious yarns with all the relevant information to calculate the right amount of wool you’ll need: the thread count and the subsequent length count (approximately pre-calculated).
In order to better understand what it’s all about, I suggest you read this post by Federico Scatizzi, where you can understand the simple way to calculate the length (and consequently the total quantity) for any kind of yarn. I assure you the information is very clear and straightforward.

In this article I will give you a practical example of how to estimate the amount of Cashmere needed for a given knitting project. Further posts will follow to cover the subject in more depth.
Let’s start with a pattern. I’ve chosen the V-neck pullover created by Heidi Kirrmaier and published on Raverly. It’s basic and unisex. Unpretentious styles work well with Cashmere.

You may download the instructions (in English) for different sizes here for free. Information from the designer are:
stocking stitch sample: 16 stitches and 23 rows = 10 cm x 10 cm sample
Knitting needles size: 4.5 – 5.0
Sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL, XXXL (chest measurement from 80 to 140 cm)
total length estimated : 872 m – 1427 m
This information, the total amount of wool needed, is very important, more so than the weight of the yarn.

To calculate the amount of cashmere needed for this pattern, I have chosen the smallest size, that is XS (chest 80 cm). According to the designer’s indications, for sizes S and M 8 balls of wool of 109 m each are enough for a total of 872 m of yarn).
This is the moment when I choose the type of yarn I’ll knit the sweater with. Let’s assume I pick the Eco Cashmere in 250 gr (= 575 m) hanks (to use with 4.5-5 needles, as instructed by the designer). By calculating (872 x 250) : 575 = 380, I will therefore need around 380 gr of the type of yarn I have chosen. One hank won’t be enough, I’ll need two: 500 g = 1150 m.

I could use the leftover yarn for a scarf or a neck warmer :-). To have two pieces of cashmere at such a low price is a real bargain :-).
Or maybe I’ll buy even more and instead of making one sweater, I’ll make two, one for my partner as well!

http://www.ravelry.com/projects/WoolinHand/simple-summer-tweed-top-down-v-neck

If you choose a pattern from a magazine, you won’t find the information concerning the length for the garment you want to knit. You will have to work it out yourself by taking into account the amount needed of X yarn suggested for that style. For example: 600gr, that is 12 balls of 50 gr will be necessary for a total of 70 m (12 balls x 70 m = 840 m). So in order to make that pattern you’ll need approximately 840 m of yarn.

Hopefully it’s clear enough… have fun with your projects.

Alicja Kwartnik

for Hircus Filati


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Modello di Irma Bruni

Irma Bruni ci ha gentilmente concesso il piacere di pubblicare le foto di questo modello che ha realizzato personalmente con i nostri filati 2/28 100% cashmere lavorato sulla macchina da maglieria finezza 3

www.florencecashmereyarn.com


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Filato Ecocashmere

I filati in cashmere vengono realizzati da fiocco di cashmere proveniente dalla capra del Cashmere denominata anche Hyrcus.

La capra viene tosata ed il vello viene ripulito dalle impurità, spesso manualmente, e lavato con speciali metodi, dopodichè viene filato

Qui di seguito puoi vedere due esempi di fiocco di cashmere pulito e lavato, pronto per essere filato.

I filati Ecocashmere invece sono fatti da una parte di fiocco e una parte di fibra rigenerata, o a volte anche completamente di fibra rigenerata.

La fibra rigenerata sono avanzi di fibra proveniente dalla filatura di cashmere in fioco e/o di maglie vecchie, ripulite dalle impurità e rilavorate per poter ricreare il filato.

La processo di lavorazione della maglia vecchia richiede tempo e risorse. La maglia deve essere ripulita dalle impurità, quali etichette, eventuali cuciture sintetiche e tutto quello che non è cashmere (questo processo viene fatto interamente a mano), dopodichè viene tagliata, sfilacciata, a volte garnettata, in base al tipo di filato che bisogna realizzare, infine viene filata.

La qualità è la stessa dei filati realizzati da fiocco. La sofficità, la mano non è proprio la stessa, manon fa pilling. Per quanto riguarda la coibenza termica, la resistenza meccanica, l’assorbimento dell’umidità, cioè tutte le caratteristiche tipiche della lana e del cashmere, non c’è nessuna differenza.

L’Ecocashmere è un prodotto pregiato e raro, che consente di riciclare la fibra consentendo un basso impatto aziendale.

Nel video qui sotto puoi vedere il processo di sfilacciatura della maglia vecchia riciclata.

Federico Scatizzi

www.florencecashmereyarn.com


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